Jan 022018

Hello friends. It’s a new year. 😀 My investment strategy for 2017 was simple; to buy dividend growth stocks and alternative investments. Dividend stocks and alternative assets tend to grow in bull markets but also hold up well in recessions. The plan is to earn respectable returns while reducing risk to the downside. Here are my 2017 results.

Average return on investable assets = 18.9%

Overall I am quite thrilled with this outcome. 🙂 The broad Canadian stock market index (S&P/TSX Composite) returned about 9% in 2017. I remain convinced that a dividend based investment strategy works better than index funds.

Another variable that worked to my advantage is geographical diversification. Most equity markets in foreign countries performed extremely well. For example, the S&P 500 index in the U.S. gained 20%. Holding U.S. and European stocks helped me a lot this year.

The Best of 2017

Liquid’s Top 10 Best performing stocks of the year:

  1. Canopy Growth Corp (WEED) +213%
  2. Match Group Inc (MTCH) +82%
  3. Caterpillar (CAT) +64%
  4. Avigilon Corp (AVO) +63%
  5. Dollarama (DOL) +59%
  6. Amazon.com (AMZN) +58%
  7. Premium Brands Holdings (PBH) +55%
  8. Deere and Co (DE) +55%
  9. Blackberry (BB) +54%
  10. Netflix (NFLX) +53%

The Worst of 2017

Liquid’s Top 10 Worst performing stocks of the year:

  1. Crescent Point Energy (CPG) -45%
  2. High Liner Foods (HLF) -23%
  3. Cineplex (CGX) -22%
  4. Cameco Corp (CCO) -14%
  5. Viacom (VIAB) -10%
  6. Halliburton (HAL) -8%
  7. Keyera Corp (KEY) -7%
  8. Boardwalk REIT (BEI.UN) -7%
  9. Target Corp (TGT) -6%
  10. Goldcorp (G) -5%

We can’t win them all. But as long as we get it right most of the time then everything will work out eventually. 🙂



2017 Investment Breakdown

All returns mentioned below are internal rate of returns (IRR) unless otherwise stated.

TD Portfolio 
Annual return = 16.3%
Net Asset Value = $190K

This includes my entire RRSP portfolio, most of my TFSA and a small cash account all held within TD Direct Investing. The combined return over the last 12 months was 16.28%.

I hold about 15 individual securities in my TD TFSA, and another 30 in my RRSP account. If you are interested to see exactly what they are I’ve listed all the stocks on my portfolio page. 😀

Note: Past performance doesn’t guarantee future results and readers should not take any stocks I buy as recommendations.


Interactive Brokers – Non Registered Portfolio
Annual return = 25.3%
Net Asset Value = $158K

This is where I have my margin account. I hold Canadian, U.S. and U.K. securities in here – mostly preferred stocks and dividend stocks due to the preferential tax treatment of their returns. One reason the return is so high in this portfolio is because I am using leverage (borrowing money to invest.)

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Sep 262016

When Average Isn’t Enough

Everyone knows that exotic dancers are bad at investing. After all, they always end up losing their shirts. 😆 But they are not alone. Most people in general are simply not very successful at investing.

According to BlackRock, the largest financial management company in the world with nearly $5 trillion of AUM, the average American investor managed to make only 2.11% return per year over the past 2 decades.Â đŸ˜±


The saddest part is how this number is even lower than inflation, lol. So in terms of real returns people actually lost money. 🙁 There are many reasons for this low performance. Investors’ sentiments, emotions, and personal goals are all factors. But the reason I want to discuss today is the improper use of investment tools.

Why People Are Generally Bad at Investing

Reason 1 – Not using tax sheltered vehicles

The Roth IRA is a great example of a tax savings vehicle that many American investors have overlooked. In Canada we have the Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA) which has similar benefits; Any investment gains realized within this account is tax free. 🙂

The first problem is that most people don’t use it. According to the CRA, in 2013 only 38% of eligible Canadians have opened TFSAs. The second issue is those who do have this account aren’t making the most of the tax savings. Data from RBC Royal Bank suggests that its clients tend to play it safe when it comes to their TFSA with 44% of holdings in high interest savings accounts. *Yawn* Another 21% is invested in GICs which are also producing rock bottom returns right now. This means only the remaining 35% of the money in TFSAs are actually used for proper investments that hold stocks, bonds, and other asset classes that have a decent chance at beating inflation.

This essentially means that only about 13% of TFSA eligible Canadians are using the investment vehicle correctly. But even less have taken maximum advantage of it because only 7% have fully maxed out their contributions. Of course everyone has different financials goals, which alludes to my post about the debt spectrum. So it may be perfectly suitable for a retiree to put all of his savings into a GIC if it suits his investment objectives. But in general 2.11% should not be the target most investors should aim for. 😉

Taxation is one of the costliest expense on investment returns. If more investors make better use of tax advantaged accounts they can leave more money in their own pockets. 🙂

Random Useless Fact:

33% of Harvard University students get the following question wrong.