Apr 012017
 

A Real Education About Money

April is officially financial literacy month. Yay! Information is free and everywhere. The problem is some can be misleading. One of my favourite PF gurus, Gail Vaz-Oxlade, recently noticed a slough of pretentious ninnies online pretending to be financial experts.

Personal finance is really popular these days. But I agree with Gail. Real financial advice is rare. I bet dollars to doughnuts many bloggers don’t know what they’re talking about 😛 The current education system is failing the public. This is why I’ve created my high school investing course.

Retiring early should be achievable for anyone. So over the next few months I will be visiting various secondary schools around the city to lecture and teach students how to make money, using other people’s money. 😀 Financial experts such as Robert Kiyosaki have been using this lucrative strategy for decades to make millions. 😉

I was compelled to take on this project after receiving tons of positive feedback from visitors about how reading my blog has made them a lot of money. On my previous post about index investing, one commentator even suggested I charge exorbitant fees to do consulting work, haha. 😉

Let’s be honest. As an authority in this area I should take on a leading role to help others make sense of the financial world. And the best time to teach someone is when they’re young. 😀 I already have years of teaching experience. So naturally I am the best person for this job. 🙂

The Investment Course Outline

For now things are going as planned. After a few meetings with the trustees of the Vancouver School Board I managed to convince them to allow me to give classes to grade 10 students. The course is once a week for 8 weeks. This will be a mandatory part of their Career and Personal Planning (CAPP) program that all students must take to graduate.

Okay. So the first 4 classes will be focused on learning how to use margin accounts to increase stock returns. For example, I started using 2.5 times leverage with margin debt in 2011. By 2014 I showed how my portfolio had doubled in value (100% gain.) This would not have been possible with cash savings alone.

Continue reading »

Apr 012016
 

Quitting my Job

There comes a day in everyone’s life where they have to throw in the towel. After holding down 2 jobs for the past 8 years I felt it was time for me to quit. I’m simply getting too old for the workplace. And after analyzing my financial situation I realized that I do indeed have the means right now to leave the rat race and live solely off my investments forever!

So I quit my part-time job in early March. And then a couple weeks ago I handed in my letter of resignation to my full-time employer. The company tried to keep me because I’m rather good at my job. Much like a carpenter, I’m always able to nail my work. My manager even offered me a 30% raise if I stay, but I politely declined.

Yesterday was officially my last day at work so I’m finally free from the grind! From now on I can enjoy life to the fullest on my own terms. 🙂 Woot!

16-03-freedom-braveheart-quote-scene

Enjoy unlimited free time for the rest of my life? Yeah, I think I could get use to this.

But one obstacle that can stand in the way of true freedom is debt. 🙁 To obtain real financial security I knew I had to get rid of all my debt. So I decided to make some major changes to my balance sheet.

Selling the Farmland

I bought a farm in 2012 for $150,000. And then bought another farm for $172,500 in the following year, for a combined purchase price of $322,500.

Well I recently sold both my farms for $550,000 to a single buyer. Yay! This $200,000+ capital appreciation is due to the strong demand in this area. According to an official Farm Credit Canada report, farmland values in Saskatchewan have increased 83% on average from the beginning of 2012 to the end of 2014. Amazeballs!

16-03-farmland-saskatchewan-yearly-returns

We don’t have the official numbers for 2015 yet. But according to another FCC report, “increases could be as high as 9%, with some upside to reach higher.”

Although I was able to sell my farms for a total price of $550,000, I had to pay $20,000 in agent and legal fees, pay off the remaining $195,000 of farm loans to the bank, and set aside another $35,000 for capital gains tax.

So in the end I only ended up with $300,000. But hey, I’ll take what I can get. 😉

No More Debt

As shown in my most recent net worth update I had roughly $300K of non-farm debt last month, including a mortgage, LOCs, etc. Well over the last week I used the net proceeds from selling the farmland to pay off the balance of all my remaining loans so now I’m completely debt free! 😀

16-04-forever-alone-meme-debt-free-nobody-calls

New Balance Sheet

So with the farmland and debts gone, here’s what my new net worth looks like.

Assets: Total = $530,000
Cash: $7,000
Primary Residence: $263,000
Non Registered Investments: $200,000
RRSP/RRIF: $60,000

Liabilities: None 🙂

Net Worth = $530,000

It’s such a relief to finally be debt free! 😀 My balance sheet looks a lot cleaner without all those pesky liabilities. Debt is evil. I will never go into debt ever again! Debtors are losers.

Continue reading »