Sep 212015

The Profit Motive

What is profit? It’s often described as a financial gain, especially the difference between the amount earned and the amount spent in buying, operating, or producing something. For example if the mint makes 25 cent coins, then it should expect quarterly profits. 😆 But here on Freedom 35 we like to think outside the box. So here’s another definition.

Profit: Any type of advantage or benefit that’s gained from an investment.

This means that profit doesn’t have to be measured in currency. In fact, we all have different profit motives that drive us to get out of bed each morning, and most of those motives aren’t related to money intrinsically. If we attend school and hope to gain more than the time and effort we invest into our education then our profit is more knowledge. If we cook a meal then our profit is the food we get to eat.🍗 If we invest in a marriage then we expect to profit from being in a stable and committed relationship. If we decide to hangout with some pals, then everyone is investing their time hoping to profit from mutual friendship, fun experiences, and companionship. If we invest in working out then we profit by becoming healthier, or living longer.


Profit in regards to actual money, as in a financial profit, is only a small part of our overall desire to profit in general. Since money isn’t useful in and of itself we can only use it as a proxy to hold value so that we can exchange it for something else later. :) This is why it’s important to not get emotionally attached to money. Money is the form of profit that is not personalized. If our friend offers to drive us to the airport, we would feel very grateful of course. But if they tell us it would cost $30, then we would feel offended. How dare they undermine our friendship and disrespect us. 😠 That’s because there’s a personal relationship at stake. But if we take a taxi to the airport it’s then conventional to use money to measure the value of that service. So cash is what we use to gauge profit if there’s not a personal relationship involved with a transaction.

Profit can come in many different shapes and forms. We’re always hoping to profit, or gain more, than we’re investing into something. Otherwise there’s no point in doing it. It’s not selfish to think of life as this way because it’s just part of nature. The entire animal kingdom is driven by profit motives. :)

Random Useless Fact: 

Thousand Island dressing is called American Sauce in Germany.


Sep 182015

Millennials Create Their Own Opportunities

Some people believe millennials are the screwed generation because there are no jobs for us. And that we have every right to be angry at the older generation for pillaging public coffers, taking on loads of debt, and leaving the broken economy for the younger generation to fix.
But I don’t see it that way. So what if there aren’t a lot of high paying jobs out there for young workers anymore? Any job is a good job because any income is better than no income. The world can be an amazing place if we just lower our standards a bit. 😀
And just because there are no jobs, it doesn’t mean there is no work. Jobs are given to us, but work can be self created. Don’t ask what the world can give us. Ask what we can produce for the world instead. 😉 Starting a small business is easy. When I was 14 I shovelled snow for my neighbours during the winter. Clearing each driveway earned me $10. Cutting grass would be a great opportunity to make money in the summer. There are plenty of busy households who would gladly pay $25 for someone else to mow their lawn every couple of weeks. Their time is valuable. And all that’s required for this to happen is for some proactive entrepreneur to go knock on their door and say, “Hey, here’s what I can do for you. How about it?”
We can also develop knowledge based skills to make money. Being the first group of people to grow up with cell phones, laptops, and the internet millennials have a technological advantage over other working adults today. We can create a free blog in minutes. Social networks keep us informed and enable us to discuss our ideas with anyone from anywhere on the planet. We can download entire first year courses from Yale, Harvard, and other universities for free from their websites. There are non-profit organizations, such as the Khan Academy, which have free lectures on subjects like math, science, computer programming, history, art, philosophy, economics, and more. There’s also plenty of informational YouTube videos that teach everything from how to put on make-up, to how to start a small business, to how to make ricotta and spinach ravioli. 🍴 Yum! Access to information is so ubiquitous today we can develop any knowledge based skills we desire to learn! And then use our new expertise to earn an income.

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Aug 202015

Best Cities In the World

The Economist recently released its new livability scale report. This study compares 140 cities across the world and ranks them based on factors such as political stability, healthcare, safety, and educational resources. Canadian and Australian cities dominated the top 5 spots for having the best koala-ty of life! 😀 Below are the top five cities in the list.

  1. Melbourne, Australia
  2. Vienna, Austria
  3. Vancouver, Canada
  4. Toronto, Canada
  5. Calgary, Canada and Adelaide, Australia

Similarities Between Canada and Australia

This is probably not a big surprise as both countries have a lot in common. We both export boat loads of natural resources. We have low population density and most people live in small to medium sized cities. Our economies are similar as well with national GDP in the $1.5 to $2.0 trillion range.


Even our currencies are roughly the same in value. $1 CAD currently trades for about $1.04 AUD, lol. The stock market returns between the Canadian TSX Composite index and the Australian S&P All Ordinaries index (XAO) over the past 5 years are practically identical. Both stock markets returned about 18% since August 2010.


I’m not sure if it’s even necessary for Canadians to buy Australian stocks for diversification purposes, and vice-versa, because it might not make any difference in the long run.  😕

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Jul 162015

Earlier this year a Vancouver house with a $5 million assessed value was put on the market for $6 million. Guess how much it ended up selling for? Hint, it’s in the upscale Shaughnessy neighbourhood. :)


After 12 days and multiple bids from 10 prospective buyers the 78 year old home was sold for $8 million, lol. Welcome to Vancouver. You’re welcome to buy a house here, as long as you’re willing to pay $2 million over the asking price. 😛

Our hot real estate market is about to get even more extreme because yesterday morning the Bank of Canada announced another 0.25% rate cut. Holy pumpernickel! Now it will be even harder to raise rates in the future without pricking the bubble. 📌

The Effects of the Rate Cut ✂

The overnight lending rate was lowered to 0.5% in an attempt to boost capital expenditure and drive companies to spend more on hiring and manufacturing. However this will also unintentionally persuade already heavily indebted consumers to take on even more debt.

The problem with monetary policy is that it affects the entire country even though places like Vancouver really don’t need any further easing of credit. A better solution would have been to address the faltering economy in some parts of Canada, like Alberta, using targeted fiscal policy instead of a blanket rate cut. But that’s just my personal opinion.

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Jul 012015

The European debt crisis is so confusing, it’s like Greek to me. lol 😀 As of yesterday Greece became the first developed country to default to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to the tune of €1.6 billion. Overall Greece owes about €300 billion to all its creditors.


A referendum in Greece will be held this upcoming weekend to decide if the Greek people would like to stay in the European Union and continue using the Euro, or exit the EU and revert back to their old national currency. What happens next is the million-euro question. A Greece exit (Grexit) should not have a large direct impact on other countries. But here are some lessens we can take away from the predicament facing Greece right now.

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