Oct 032017
 

We are now 3 quarters into the year. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq both hit an all time high to close out September. Up here in Canada the S&P/TSX Composite grew by 3.7%. Gross domestic product (GDP) was essentially unchanged, at zero per cent growth in July compared with June, Statistics Canada said last week. I suspect that the slower start to Q3 is indicative of what’s to come for the rest of the year. The good thing is inflation should remain low at sub 1.6%. I wonder if the Bank of Canada raised interest rates too quickly over the summer.

September had turned out to be a great month. A rising stock market raises all boats so my brokerage accounts performed well across the board. I’m quite happy with the outcome. 🙂

Liquid’s Financial Update

*Side Incomes:

  • Part-Time = $700
  • Freelance = $1200
  • Dividends = $800
  • Interest = $600
*Discretionary Spending:
  • Fun = $400
  • Debt Interest = $1300

*Net Worth: (ΔMoM)

  • Assets: = $1,121,700 total (+9,100)
  • Cash = $3,600 (+600)
  • Canadian stocks = $151,700 (+3200)
  • U.S. stocks = $93,900 (+3500)
  • U.K. stocks = $20,200 (+500)
  • RRSP = $83,900 (+1500)
  • Mortgage Funds = $31,300 (-200)
  • Peer-to-Peer Lending = $21,500 (+200)
  • SolarShare Bonds = $9,600 (-200)
  • Home = $270,000
  • Farms = $436,000
  • Debts: = $474,700 total (-4,000)
  • Mortgage = $181,700 (-400)
  • Farm Loans = $187,300 (-500)
  • Margin Loans = $57,600 (-100)
  • TD Line of Credit = $9,400  (-1800)
  • CIBC Line of Credit = $23,000 (-1000)
  • HELOC = $15,700 (-200)

*Total Net Worth = $647,000 (+$13,100 / +2.1%)
All numbers above are in $CDN. 

My year over year net worth gain is $109,500. I plan to continue paying down debt while building up my retirement fund over the next 3 months. By the end of this year I hope to have a net worth of $675,000.

 

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Random Useless Fact

Jul 052017
 

In an interesting turn of events the Canadian dollar is showing signs of strength. It gained against the US dollar and the British pound. This is a double edged sword. The good news is my wealth is greater since I have more purchasing power. 🙂 The bad news is my net worth in Canadian dollars went down. 🙁

Since I have investments in foreign currency my assets fell in value. Oh well. I’m not cashing out any time soon so I will continue to hold and see what happens. Energy companies also lost value in June, following lower oil prices. I also purchased a vehicle in cash that cost over $1,000. It was expensive, but it’s important to have a life. 🙂

Liquid’s Financial Update

*Side Incomes:

  • Part-Time = $900
  • Freelance = $800
  • Dividends = $800
  • Interest = $200
*Discretionary Spending:
  • Fun = $1500
  • Debt Interest = $1100

*Net Worth: (ΔMoM)

  • Assets: = $1,113,700 total (-6,300)
  • Cash = $5,300 (+2100)
  • Canadian stocks = $146,400 (-200)
  • U.S. stocks = $91,600 (-4600)
  • U.K. stocks = $20,100 (-1300)
  • RRSP = $82,600 (-2800)
  • Mortgage Funds = $31,000 (+300)
  • Peer-to-Peer Lending = $20,900 (+200)
  • SolarShare Bonds = $9,800
  • Home = $270,000
  • Farms = $436,000
  • Debts: = $486,000 total (-5,500)
  • Mortgage = $182,900 (-500)
  • Farm Loans = $188,800 (-500)
  • Margin Loans = $60,300 (-3200)
  • TD Line of Credit = $13,000  (-600)
  • CIBC Line of Credit = $25,000 (-500)
  • HELOC = $16,000 (-200)

*Total Net Worth = $627,700 (-$800 / -0.13%) 
All numbers above are in $CDN. 

 

This is the worst month I’ve had in over a year, lol. It looks like my fixed income assets performed well at least. Hopefully I can turn things around in July and get back to increasing my net worth.

 

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Random Useless Fact:

Canada produces over 80% of the world’s maple syrup.

May 042017
 

Stocks Continue to Climb

Technology stocks in the U.S. have recently performed exceptionally well. The Nasdaq index (full of technology stocks) reached a new high, passing 6,000 points. Stock markets reaching new highs is actually quite common. On average, this happens about once a month. But unlike the tech bubble of 2000, this time I believe technology giants such as Amazon, Apple, and Alphabet are here to stay. The industry has matured now and high tech companies have become similar to utilities. Just imagine an entire week without using any of Google’s services or any iPhones or Apple products lol.

Over the years I’ve written about why AMZN, AAPL, and GOOG are some of the best companies to own for long term investors. I hold all 3 of course. Although I am primarily a dividend investor, I will put money into growth oriented stocks as well if there’s a profitable opportunity. Amazon is up 25% so far this year. Apple is up 27%. And Alphabet (Google) is up 20%. Not bad for a span of only 4 months. 😀

Liquid’s Financial Update

*Side Incomes:

  • Part-Time = $500
  • Freelance = $800
  • Dividends = $700
  • Interest = $500
*Discretionary Spending:
  • Fun = $300
  • Debt Interest = $1100

*Net Worth: (ΔMoM)

  • Assets: = $1,112,800 total (+14,900)
  • Cash = $4,200 (+2000) ~ Saving up to make a major purchase in May.
  • Canadian stocks = $146,800 (+1100)
  • U.S. stocks = $95,300 (+5200) ~ Strong gains here partly due to a lower $CAD
  • U.K. stocks = $20,700 (+1100)
  • RRSP = $78,900 (+2500) ~ I have many U.S. stocks in there.
  • Mortgage Funds = $30,600 (-200) ~ Most MICs lost ground in April.
  • Peer-to-Peer Lending = $20,500 (+200)
  • SolarShare Bonds = $9,800
  • Home = $270,000
  • Farms = $436,000 (+3000) ~ Increasing farmland value due to inflation. 
  • Debts: = $494,800 total (-400)
  • Mortgage = $183,800 (-500)
  • Farm Loans = $189,800 (-500)
  • Margin Loans = $64,600 (+1800)
  • TD Line of Credit = $14,200  (-600)
  • CIBC Line of Credit = $26,000 (-500)
  • HELOC = $16,400 (-100)

*Total Net Worth = $618,000 (+$15,300 / +2.5%)
All numbers above are in $CDN. 

I am so glad I have investments outside of Canada in April. The British Pound gained a lot of strength boosting my U.K. stocks by about 6% in $CDN terms. The United States dollar and stock market also went up a lot. My U.S. stock portfolio gained $5,200. Sweet! But on the flip side, my U.S. margin loan increased by about $1,800. This is the reality about buying U.S. stocks on margin; it’s great for my investments when the U.S. currency appreciates, but it also means I owe more money when everything is converted back into $CDN, lol. Oh well. I hope everything will work out in the long run. 🙂

 

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Random Useless Fact:

Mar 062017
 

Dow Jones trading over 21,000 points

It’s only the beginning of March and the stock market indexes are already up 6% to 9% year to date in the United States. The Dow closed over 21,000 points last Friday. Of course hitting new highs is nothing special for the stock markets. But who knows how long this momentum will last.  We have confirmation from the Federal Reserve that interest rates in the United States will increase next week by a small amount. I expect this will cool the financial markets. Afterall, since World War II, 77% of Fed tightening cycles had ended in recession.

It has been a fairly predictable month for myself. I’m slowly collecting passive income while paying down my debts.

Liquid’s Financial Update

*Side Incomes:

  • Part-Time = $800
  • Freelance = $700
  • Dividends = $800
  • Interest = $200
*Discretionary Spending:
  • Fun = $500
  • Debt Interest = $1200

*Net Worth: (MoM)16-12-networthiq_chart-nov

  • Assets: = $1,088,400 total (+5,200)
  • Cash = $1,500 (+400)
  • Canadian stocks = $138,200 (-1000)
  • U.S. stocks = $90,800 (+4900)
  • U.K. stocks = $19,300 (+700)
  • RRSP = $74,900 (-100)
  • Mortgage Funds = $30,600 (+200)
  • Peer-to-Peer Lending = $20,100 (+100)
  • SolarShare Bonds = $10,000
  • Home = $270,000
  • Farms = $433,000
  • Debts: = $494,400 total (-1,800)
  • Mortgage = $184,800 (-400)
  • Farm Loans = $190,900 (-500)
  • Margin Loans = $59,600 (+300)
  • TD Line of Credit = $15,400  (-600)
  • CIBC Line of Credit = $27,000 (-500)
  • HELOC = $16,700 (-100)

*December Total Net Worth = $594,000 (+$7,000 / +1.2%)
All numbers above are in $CDN. 

Lucky me. It was another positive month in general for the markets. I’m very close to $600,000 now. 🙂

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Random Useless Fact:

 Our brains tend to find creative ways to be entertained when we’re bored.

Feb 022017
 

How High Can the Dow Go?

The Dow rose from 7,000 to 20,000 points over the last 8 years. And that doesn’t even account for the dividend payments. By using financial leverage my portfolio managed to outperform the market every year since I started buying stocks in 2009. 🙂 Borrowing to invest is risky. But if I continue to maintain a diversified portfolio of real estate, stocks, and fixed income investments, then it is very likely that my assets will grow overall in value over time. So as long as I can borrow money cheaply I will continue use leverage. It’s all about expected market return vs the cost to borrow. In my previous post from last year I explained how rich people create wealth. Using other people’s money to enhance investment gains proves to be a very effective method. I currently have about $50,000 of available funds remaining before I risk getting a margin call. This gives me quite a large safety cushion. As long as I keep an eye on this number I should be able to withstand the market cycles.

Breaking the 20,000 barrier was a huge milestone for stock investors. But can the Dow Jones continue to climb even higher? The answer may be found in American football. 🙂 Believe it or not the outcome of the Super Bowl game this weekend could have an impact on the stock market’s performance for the remainder of 2017. This idea is known as the “Super Bowl Predictor.” The predictor states that if an original NFL team wins the Super Bowl, then the Dow index will increase over the next year. Otherwise, the stock market will fall. So far this indicator had been bang on every year since 2008, except for one time. So if we want the Dow to hit 20,000 again and continue to grow this year, we better hope the Atlanta Falcons win this weekend. 😀

Anyway, since equity valuations and price/earnings ratios appear to be worryingly high, I decided it’s time to be more cautious with my money. So as I see the growing risk of a bubble forming, I have turned my attention towards alternative investments that do not correlate with the stock market. That’s why today I present a new addition to my asset column.

It’s P2P lending! 😀 Hurray! This makes a total of 10 different asset types I own. And most of them produce a stream of passive income for me! 🙂

Liquid’s Financial Update

*Side Incomes:

  • Part-Time = $900
  • Freelance = $800
  • Dividends = $800
  • Interest = $600
*Discretionary Spending:
  • Fun = $200
  • Debt Interest = $1200

*Net Worth: (MoM)16-12-networthiq_chart-nov

  • Assets: = $1,083,200 total (+33,200)
  • Cash = $1,100 (-700)
  • Canadian stocks = $139,200 (+4100)
  • U.S. stocks = $85,900 (+2700)
  • U.K. stocks = $18,600
  • RRSP = $75,000 (-100)
  • Mortgage Funds = $30,400 (+200)
  • Peer-to-Peer Lending = $20,000 (new!)
  • SolarShare Bonds = $10,000
  • Home = $270,000 (+7000)
  • Farms = $433,000
  • Debts: = $496,200 total (+16,700)
  • Mortgage = $185,200 (-300)
  • Farm Loans = $191,400 (-400)
  • Margin Loans = $59,300 (+300)
  • TD Line of Credit = $16,000  (-700)
  • CIBC Line of Credit = $27,500 (+18,000)
  • HELOC = $16,800 (-200)

*December Total Net Worth = $587,000 (+$16,500 / +2.9%)
All numbers above are in $CDN. 

January has traditionally been a very positive month for my net worth, and this year is no different. This is thanks to the phenomenon called the new year’s bump. I used the average inflation rate of 1.6% to increase my home’s value and rounded the number to $270,000, which is $7,000 higher than the previous year. Stock markets held up well this January, despite a slight pull back over the last couple of trading days.

I will write more about my new venture into the world of peer-to-peer lending in a future post. But it’s basically a fixed income investment in the form of debt financing. Compared to stock market, P2P investments have a low correlation with stocks and are less volatile. However, this doesn’t mean they’re less risky. I invested $20,000 to start. $2,000 came from personal savings, while the remaining $18,000 was borrowed, which is why both my asset and debt have grown this month. I plan to slowly pay down the new debt while I wait patiently for my new asset to grow. This is the same basic strategy I used for all my leveraged investments in the past. 😉

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Random Useless Fact:

It can be quite difficult to tell if a tiger is pregnant, or just fat.