Sep 192016
 

The Effects of Debt on Your Health

According to a Globe and Mail article I recently read, people have gotten sick and depressed thinking about their debts. “Researchers and health professionals are making the case for treating personal debt as a public health problem.” Oh no. 🙁 Dr. Donna Ferguson, a psychologist in Toronto says, “I think that it’s a major crisis. It’s an issue that needs to be addressed.”

The average consumer debt in Canada is only about $21,000. Personally I don’t think that’s a whole lot. Yet psychologists are calling this a “major crisis.” 😠 People are blaming debt for making them feel physically ill. But I have much more debt than they ever will. So if having a healthy relationship with debt is their primary goal, then they should do something to keep their stress under control. 🙂

Luckily I have a solution to help those consumers. If we want them to get better we have to address the root of the issue. The problem is with individual psychology, not with debt. Instead of creating more health problems for borrowers and increase the burden on our public healthcare system, like what Dr. Ferguson suggests, let’s try to educate people about the truth so we can prevent people from feeling ill in the first place.

So here’s my simple yet effective tip to help anyone who may have debt anxiety:

If you don’t think you can handle the debt, then don’t borrow the money. 😀

Sometimes the negative consequences of debt are blown out of proportion. The ASA, a financial support organization, has even made a horror video to show the trepidation and paranoia that comes with having student loan debt, which further supports the common narrative.

16-09-allow-debt-ruin-lives-meme

Some people have this irrational fear that if we have debt then somehow it will come to get us like the boogeyman. 😆 But the reality is nothing bad will happen as long as we make the payments on our debt.

Missing a Debt Payment is No Big Deal

The consequences for delinquent debt are very lenient towards borrowers. The bank can’t just take our house away as soon as we stop making mortgage payments. In my neck of the woods for example, the bank has to first draft up a foreclosure petition if a mortgage payment is 3 months late. Then the court hearing will be a month later. And then the property goes into a redemption period for up to 6 more months. So we have plenty of time throughout this entire process to get our payments back on track. We can even sell our house if it’s worth more than the mortgage balance.

For other types of debt, if money becomes tight we can enter into consumer proposal or apply for other debt relief options. We’re usually given at least 3 months to catch up on our payments before it goes to a collections agency. Despite the scary rumors, consumer debt cannot physically harm us. We won’t be assaulted or locked up if we’re late on our credit card payments. Nobody will drag us to jail because we failed to make a car payment, lol. The worst they can do to us is take the car away and tarnish our credit score. But I think that’s only fair. Our vehicle is being repossessed only because we broke the debtor/creditor agreement first.

So there’s no reason to get all worried and stressed out over a reasonable amount of debt. 🙂 We just have to be smart and not borrow too much.

__________________________________
Random Useless Fact:

If the original Power Rangers series were made today in 2016, it would probably offend too many people and be banned from airing in most countries.

16-09-power-rangers-pose-faces

The yellow ranger was Asian. The red ranger was Native American. The pink ranger was portrayed as a ditsy white girl. The black ranger was black. And in later episodes they introduced the white power ranger who was the strongest.

Sep 082016
 

The Debt Free Fallacy

The mainstream concept of debt creates unnecessary anxiety for people. Innocent consumers are made to believe that if they have $2,000 of credit card debt at 18% interest rate then that’s somehow a terrible thing and paying this off should be their first financial priority. But that’s a load of baloney, 😛 because we all know that paying for things like food is more important.

But let’s say they made some sacrifices to quickly pay off this $2,000 credit card balance. “What a big relief!” they tell themselves. “I’m finally debt free. It feels like a great weight has been lifted off my shoulders.”

But has it really? I’m all for celebrating financial achievements but let’s put things into perspective. That $2,000 of debt was only costing them $30 per month in interest. That’s less than 1% of most household budgets. It’s really just a drop in the bucket.

So yes they are debt free. But they don’t realize that they had to give up $2,000 of hard earned money in order to pay for their “debt free” privilege. That money could have been used for a wonderful vacation to Maui instead of paying back the loan. If they cut their internet or cell phone bills by $40 a month, then that would be more beneficial financially speaking than paying off their credit card balance.

16-09-grind-gears-debt-free-bad-goal-meme

What’s so great about being debt free anyway? Even after they pay off their $2,000 consumer debt they’re still on the hook for everything else in life. It’s not like the other 99% of household spending magically goes away because they no longer have any more debt payments. There would be almost no difference in how they live now compared to when they still owed $2,000. In fact, having reasonable amounts of debt is actually advantageous because it would help build their credit history.

Continue reading »

Mar 222015
 

I really like new cars. I kept on trading and trading…and I was buying a lot of gifts for people and getting more and more into debt,” says D’Arcy George who lives in Lethbridge, Alberta. Eventually his spending habits caught up to him and D’Arcy was up to $70,000 in debt and struggled with a bank account constantly in overdraft. But D’Arcy’s experience is not unique.

In a province where the average wage is over $28/hour, a sustained period of low interest rates has caused consumers to become overconfident in the economy which has led to rising consumer debt. But now that oil and gas prices have slumped some people are forced to re-examine their financial situations. 😕

D’Arcy has realized this reality and has taken dramatic steps to get his debt under control. He started a second job at Costco to make more money. He now works every day of the week, often more than 12 hours a day, and he drives a used car. “I feel more confident that I can save money and know how to handle it,” he says. “I always have a balance of $8,000 in the bank and I get worried if I have less.

Canadians are getting the message when it comes to our consumer debt. A recent report from TransUnion shows the average Canadian individual owed $21,428 non-mortgage debt by the end of 2014. This number includes credit cards, lines of credit, student loans, and other types of credit products but does not include mortgages, home equity lines of credits, or margin loans.

15-03-rising-consumer-debt-canada

$21,428 is up 2.3% compared to the previous year. However digging deeper into the number we see that Lines of Credits, which make up 40% of consumer debt, has increased by 4.4%, while credit card debt has actually fallen by 2%. In other words consumers are getting smarter about where they’re borrowing money from. People are familiarizing themselves with how credit works and are making better decisions about their spending habits overall. 🙂

Continue reading »