Dec 072015
 

Breaking Through the Mental Barriers

For most of humanity the world believed that it was not physically possible for humans to run a mile in 4 minutes or less. This was a universal belief because the challenge had been attempted by athletes across many generations throughout human history but no one had ever succeeded. 🙁

But then something miraculous happened in 1954. A man named Roger Bannister stunned the world when he ran an entire mile (1.609 km,) in 3 minutes and 59.4 seconds! 😀

Later that year during the British Empire and Commonwealth Games hosted in Vancouver, B.C., Roger Bannister and Australia’s John Landy both ran a mile in less than 4 minutes. The race’s final moment is memorialized in a statue of the two placed in front of the PNE entrance plaza.

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But here’s the amazing part. Since 1954, over 1,000 people, including high-school students, have successfully broken the 4 minute barrier. Nobody could run a mile in 4 minutes prior to 1954, but now new runners are joining the 4 minute club every year. So what the heck changed in the last six decades? 😕 I don’t think a bunch of people suddenly developed super-human speed and endurance, although that would be pretty cool. 😉

What actually changed was people’s beliefs. Bannister didn’t just become the first person to run a 4 minute mile. His most significant achievement was changing the world’s perception about what a person is capable of doing. Prior to 1954 a 4 minute mile was simply considered impossible. But after 1954, everyone knew it had been done, so it must be possible. The psychological barrier had at last been shattered. Everyone believed that if someone else can do it then I can do it too. If someone else can make their dream into a reality then so can I! 🙂

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The biggest barriers to financial enlightenment that most people face are not physical, but rather psychological in nature. Michelangelo once said, “the greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short; but in setting our aim too low, and achieving our mark.” This is why it’s important to set ambitious goals.

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